Tiny, extremely fast, no-dependancy test framework for node ECM
You can not select more than 25 topics Topics must start with a letter or number, can include dashes ('-') and can be up to 35 characters long.
 
Jonatan Nilsson 9d2b71339c Added helpers into cb: 7 months ago
lib Added helpers into cb: 7 months ago
test Added helpers into cb: 7 months ago
.gitignore Initial commit 3 years ago
LICENSE spy/stub: Add support for lastCall 1 year ago
README.md Readme: Add badge 1 year ago
appveyor.yml Added helpers into cb: 7 months ago
cli.mjs cli: Add ability to override default timeout as well as ignore only tests 11 months ago
index.mjs Added basic spy() and stub() functionality 1 year ago
package.json Added helpers into cb: 7 months ago

README.md

eltro Build status

Eltro is a no-nonsense, no dependancy, small test framework created to use in node 13 or higher using ECM modules.

Installation

Install with npm globally:

$ npm install --global eltro

or as a development dependency for your project:

$ npm install --save-dev eltro

Getting started

$ npm install --save-dev eltro
$ mkdir test

Next in your favourite editor, create test/test.mjs:

import { Eltro as t, assert} from 'eltro'

t.describe('Array', function() {
  t.before(function() {
    // Prepare our test if needed
  })

  t.describe('#indexOf()', function() {
    t.test('should return -1 when value is not present', function() {
      assert.equal([1,2,3].indexOf(4), -1)
    })
  })

  t.after(function() {
    // Cleanup after if needed
  })
})

Set up a test script in package.json:

"scripts": {
  "test": "eltro"
}

Then run tests with:

$ npm test


  test/test.mjs
    √ Array #indexOf() should return -1 when value is not present


  1 passing (3ms)

Assertions

Not only does eltro allow you to use any assertion library of your own choosing, it also comes with it's own assertion library based on node's default assert with a few extra methods:

  • assert.notOk(value, [message]): Assert value is not ok.
  • assert.match(value, test, [message]): Check if value matches RegExp test.
  • assert.notMatch(value, [message]): Check if value does not match RegExp test.
  • assert.isFulfilled(promise, [message]): Assert the promise resolves.
  • assert.isRejected(promise, [message]): Assert the promise gets rejects.

Asynchronous Code

Eltro supports any type of asynchronous code testing. It can either be done by adding a parameter to the function (usually done) that gets called once the tests done but eltro also supports promises.

Example of testing using done:

import { Eltro as t, assert} from 'eltro'

t.describe('User', function() {
  t.describe('#save()', function() {
    t.test('should save without error', function(done) {
      var user = new User('Luna')
      user.save(function(err) {
        if (err) done(err)
        else done()
      })
    })
  })
})

Alternatively, just use the done() callback directly (which will handle an error argument, if it exists):

import { Eltro as t, assert} from 'eltro'

t.describe('User', function() {
  t.describe('#save()', function() {
    t.test('should save without error', function(done) {
      var user = new User('Luna')
      user.save(done)
    })
  })
})

Or another alternative is to use promises and return a promise directly:

import { Eltro as t, assert} from 'eltro'

t.test('should complete this test', function(done) {
  return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
    reject(new Error('Uh oh, something went wrong'))
  }).then(done)
})

Which works well with async/await like so:

t.test('async test', async function() {
  let user = await User.find({ username: 'test' })
  assert.ok(user)
})

Api

t.test(message, func)

Queue up the func as a test with the specified messagt.

t.describe(message, func)

In case you wanna describe a bunch of tests, you can add them inside func and it will have the specified message prepended before every test:

import { Eltro as t, assert} from 'eltro'

function someFunction() { return true }

t.describe('#someFunction()', function() {
  t.test('should always return true', function() {
    assert.strictEqual(someFunction(), true)
    assert.strictEqual(someFunction(), true)
    assert.strictEqual(someFunction(), true)
  })
})

will output:

#someFunction() should always return true

t.before(func)

Queue up the func to run before any test or groups within current active group.

import { Eltro as t, assert} from 'eltro'

t.before(function() {
  // Prepare something before we start any of the below tests
})

t.describe('#myTest()', function() {
  t.before(function() {
    // Runs before the test below
  })

  t.test('true should always be true', function() {
    assert.strictEqual(true, true)
  })
})

t.describe('#anotherTest()', function() {
  t.before(function() {
    // Runs before the test below
  })

  t.test('false should always be false', function() {
    assert.strictEqual(false, false)
  })
})

t.after(func)

Queue up the func to run after any test or groups within current active group.

import { Eltro as t, assert} from 'eltro'

t.after(function() {
  // After we finish all the tests below, this gets run
})

t.describe('#myTest()', function() {
  t.after(function() {
    // Runs after the test below
  })

  t.test('true should always be true', function() {
    assert.strictEqual(true, true)
  })
})

t.describe('#anotherTest()', function() {
  t.after(function() {
    // Runs after the test below
  })

  t.test('false should always be false', function() {
    assert.strictEqual(false, false)
  })
})

t.only()

Eltro supports exclusivity when running tests. When specified, only tests marked with only will be run.

You can do exclusivity on tests by adding .only() in front of describe, after or before the test like so:

t.only().describe('Only these will run', function() {
  t.test('this one', function() { assert.strictEqual(true, true) })
  t.test('and this one', function() { assert.strictEqual(true, true) })
})

You can also put it on individual test like so

t.test('Only run this test', function() {
  assert.strictEqual(true, true)
}).only()

or like so:

t.only().test('Only run this test', function() {
  assert.strictEqual(true, true)
})

t.skip()

You can skip tests easily by adding .skip() before describe, before or after the test like so:

t.skip().describe('None of these will run', function() {
  t.test('not this', function() { assert.strictEqual(true, true) })
  t.test('or this one', function() { assert.strictEqual(true, true) })
})

You can also do it on individual tests like so:

t.test('Skip due to something being broken', function() {
  BrokenFunction()
}).skip()

or like so:

t.skip().test('Skip this', function() { ... })

t.timeout(dur)

Tests can take a long time. By default, eltro will cancel a test if it takes longer than 2 seconds. You can however override this by calling the timeout function after or before the test or before the describe with the specified duration in milliseconds like so:

t.timeout(5000).describe('These will all have same timeout', function() {
  t.test('One slow function', async function() { ... })
  t.test('Another slow function', async function() { ... })
})

Or apply to individual test like so:

t.test('This is a really long test', async function() {
  await DoSomethingForReallyLongTime()
}).timeout(5000) // 5 seconds

or like so:

t.timeout(5000).test('A long test', async function() { ... })